What Rushing Your Design Project Really Means

If you do not plan to allow enough time for your project to be designed, printed and delivered, then you may still be able to have your project completed in time, but the design will have to be rushed.

This means that your designer will put away other client's work and work late nights, even weekends, to get your project out – but at a price. And the price takes several forms other than just financial.

The cost of rushing your project includes:

– Skipping important parts of the design process: With less time there's often not enough time allowed for a designer to spend much time at all on a creative approach or concept for your project. There also may not be enough time for your designer to present a lot of concepts to you or to go through a lot of revisions. You'll also be rushed through the approval cycle – which means it's more likely that you might miss your deadline.

– Quality may suffer: With less time and more stress the finished product often will not be of as high quality as it could be. In design this could mean poorly prepared files, the details of the design are not always attended to, or that a website is coded poorly. None of this will greatly harm the effectiveness of a finished piece, but it's always nicer to have a beautiful, perfect finished piece that has one that's almost all the way there.

– Financial costs: Just like any other profession a designer will charge extra for the late nights and other sacrifices that a rush project requires. It's an industry standard to charge one and a half times the normal cost of a project to rush it.

– Not being able to ask your audience: I highly recommend that you run your desgns-in-progress past your best clients and your target audience. Doing this sort of mini focus-group will enable your clients to give you invaluable feedback on your designs, your text, and their impact on your potential clients. If your project is rushed, then there's often no time to run the design options by your clients to get their input – and you'll lose out on a valuable resource.

Lack of planning can cost you a lot extra. So I suggest allowing plenty of time to design well thought-out materials, at a leisurely pace. This will cost you less and will often produce a more effective design.

Common Legal Penaltyies For Computer Crimes

Computer technology is becoming increasingly more advanced and there is a lot of money to be made surrounding it. Where there is more money to be made, there is more criminal activity, punishable by law. The Information Act of 2000 states that there should be different penalties for different types of technological crimes. The following are common legal penalies for computer crimes.

Telecommunication service theft involves the unlawful obsolete of any telecommunications technology. This crime is punishable with a heavy fine and an undefined term of imprimination. The legal consequences vary depending on the severity of the theft. Communications intercept crime is a Class-D crime that involves the interruption of communication technology. It is punishable by one to five years in prison along with a fine and can include other infractions such as offensive material dissemination, telecommunications piracy, and other cyber frauds.

When someone changes a source code on a computer program or website, this is called computer source tampering. Those found guilty of this crime can face up to three years in prison, or a fine. Computer hacking also carries a prison sentence of up to three years.

Although all technological crimes are taken seriously, government computer systems hold the most serious consequence when violated. Trying to obtain access to a system protected by the government is a very serious crime that can have major consequences on government operations. Anyone found guilty of tampering with a government computer faces ten years in prison and a major fine.

Protecting computer technology crimes is extremely important because the world now relates heavily on the use of computer systems to operate. With one of the most common legal penalties for computer crimes being a prison sentence, the legal system has been very effective in putting new laws in place with the changing technology. Technology crimes are taken very seriously and punished harshly.

Top Workplace Harassment Questions

Harassment at work is a form of employee discrimination. It has many forms with varying degrees of seriousness and legal implication. While it is a violation of the 1964 Civil Rights act, it can often be difficult to prove in a court of law. This can lead to unanswered questions. Below are five of the most common workplace harassment questions.

Q. What are some types of workplace harassment?

Harassment at work includes sexual, racial, religious, and age-related harassment. The fear of losing a job keeps many employees from reporting harassment. Many employers have what is called an "at will" employment. If you are an "at will" employee, technically you can be terminated for no reason at all. Since this is usually your word vs. their word, it becomes difficult to prove. However, if you can prove the harassment – possibly with witnesses or pictures – this could be an important factor in your case.

Q. What is the difference between workplace harassment vs. a hostile working environment?

Harassment at work is any type of unwelcome action taken by either one employee towards another, or by members of management to subordinates. Management includes supervisors, the boss / owner or any person in a position of authority. Any unwelcome action towards an employee that violates the employee from performing job duties or makes the employee feel violated or uneasy can be considered workplace harassment.

A hostile work environment is when an employee experiences acts that provoke fear of going to work. Often, these acts are offensive intimidation initiated by the harasser. Yelling, being rude, and creating an environment full of severe stress results in a hostile work environment. Typically, hostile work situations are created by a boss or manager to provoke an employee or employees to quit their job.

Q. Are verbal threats considered harassment?

Verbal threats are considered a form of workplace harassment in West Virginia and many other states. However, until the harasser actually acts on the threats, you would only have a civil recourse and it does not become a criminal indemnity.

Q. Is slander the same as harassment?

Depending on the situation, slander is often considered a form of workplace harassment, especially if it was sexually oriented. Heinous lies, verbal attacks and rumors can discredit a person and cause not only stress in the workplace, but in his or her personal life as well. The law for slander differs from state to state. However, if you can prove the accusations, you may also have a case.

Q. I have been accused of sexual harassment at work; can my employer reprimand me without an investigation?

Employers are bound by most states to show that some sort of investigation was made in the event that an employee was accused of sexual or any type of workplace harassment. Employers can reprimand an employee through a verbal and written warning to be placed in the employee's permanent record. Sexual harassment in the workplace is a serious situation and can have a lasting impact on your career.